Everyone travels, well not so much right now because of COVID-19, but we do travel. And if you have a dog, it doesn't make you any less likely to hit the road with your best friend by your side. So, wouldn't you want to take every precaution to make sure that your four-legged buddy is as safe as can be when riding along with you? Of course, you would! This should be of particular interest to you.

According to a post on the Massachusetts State Police Facebook page, Missing Dogs Massachusetts and the Massachusetts State Police have partnered to distribute a joint message on traveling safely with your pets. A video was posted recently featuring Trooper Chad Tata and his K-9 partner Luna. In the video, Trooper Tata gives great tips on how you can travel with your dog, and do it safely.

If you were to get into an accident, there's a chance your dog could be injured and take off from the accident scene, putting them in even more danger. According to the Facebook post, if you follow the advice of Trooper Tata you may be able to save your pet's life in case of an emergency. You can check out the video... and I'll recap the highlights below for you!

Check out this video from Trooper Chad Tata on traveling safely with your dog:

(Video via Massachusetts State Police YouTube Page)

 

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Let's recap the tips offered by Trooper Tata...

 

  • Put your dog in a crate tethered to a seatbelt.
  • Use a dog seatbelt, which attaches to a harness, and not a collar.
  • Don't roll your car windows all the way down. Some dogs may try to jump out!
  • If your dog does get out of your car, call the police or animal control right away.
  • Make sure your dog has an ID tag or a microchip.

 

Trooper Tata finally reminds us that as your children are, your pet is part of your family and you should certainly treat them as precious cargo!

 

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To prepare yourself for a potential incident, always keep your vet's phone number handy, along with an after-hours clinic you can call in an emergency. The ASPCA Animal Poison Control Center also has a hotline you can call at (888) 426-4435 for advice.

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