Seasonal Temps until the Berkshires back into a deep freeze this weekend.
Temps are on the rise today and tomorrow but don’t pull out the shorts and flip flops just yet. The Berkshires will be back in another deep freeze later this weekend according to the National Weather Service.

Although today temps will hit in the upper 20s with the wind blowing up to 25 mph the wind chill value will still be as low as -2 according to the NWS. Tonight, when the wind calms the temperature will seem more seasonal with a low of 22 overnight. Thursday and Friday will be typical conditions during a New England winter.

This weekend will be out of the refrigerator and back into the freezer overnight on Saturday with temps back around -5 and through Saturday afternoon with a high only into the single numbers. The complete National Weather Service forecast is below.

Today
Increasing clouds, with a high near 29. Wind chill values as low as -2. Southwest wind 9 to 13 mph, with gusts as high as 25 mph.
Tonight
Mostly cloudy, with a low around 22. Southwest wind around 5 mph becoming calm in the evening.
Thursday
A slight chance of snow showers before 11am. Partly sunny, with a high near 37. Calm wind becoming south around 5 mph. Chance of precipitation is 20%.
Thursday Night
Mostly cloudy, with a low around 22. Calm wind.
Friday
A slight chance of snow showers before 10am. Partly sunny, with a high near 28. North wind 5 to 13 mph, with gusts as high as 23 mph. Chance of precipitation is 20%.
Friday Night
Mostly clear, with a low around -5.
Saturday
Mostly sunny and cold, with a high near 7.
Saturday Night
Partly cloudy, with a low around -5.
Sunday
Sunny, with a high near 22.
Sunday Night
A chance of snow. Mostly cloudy, with a low around 11. Chance of precipitation is 40%.
M.L.King Day
A chance of snow. Mostly cloudy, with a high near 32. Chance of precipitation is 40%.
Monday Night
Mostly cloudy, with a low around 16.
Tuesday
Partly sunny, with a high near 28.

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