if you recall, we have written numerous articles on bear sightings in the Berkshires and our tri-state region but did you know another type of "feathered fowl" has been spotted in various locations and they could also pose a problem. We are referring to wild turkeys as the population has been massive in nature as reports indicate they have been roaming in the majority of western Massachusetts and throughout the central, northeastern and southeastern parts of the Bay State.

Here is a wild turkey perched on the roof of "Our Main Man and Main Dad" Jesse's house during a winter snowstorm as weather doe not prevent them from making their daily rounds.

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Mass Audubon Naturalist, Marj Rines reiterated they are also roaming around urban areas including the capital city of Boston:

"It's amazing how far and wide they have gone. You'll now see them wandering down city streets. People should just ignore them for the most part".

Another word of warning: DO NOT attempt to feed them as they will remain on your property. Mass Wildlife suggests the following:

"Use feeders designed to keep seed off the ground, as bird seed attracts turkeys and other wild animals as they may also excrete in the seed pile and spread disease to others. Clean up any spilled bird seed every day".

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Sightings usually occur during daytime hours and they settle down atop large trees at dusk to avoid predators that could have them for dinner (how ironic!). If you meet up with any type of wild turkey, your best bet is to scare them with loud noises or spray them with water from your garden hose and if you have a dog on you property, they will run away from the vicinity within seconds.

Massachusetts residents from the Berkshires to Boston are encouraged to participate in an annual survey which serves as a data base regarding population, reproductive success an fall harvest potential. Numbers in our back yard have exceeded over 1,000 and your input is welcome to remedy the problem at hand. You can access this link by going here.

(Photos courtesy of Jesse Stewart)

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