Chris Kramek and his family now know why flood insurance is a must when you live 100 feet from the water.

Kramek, who owns a second home in Plymouth, MA, spoke with Slater on Friday and said he and his family were in The Berkshires during Tuesday's storm and was thankful that their cleaner was able to get into and check on their White Horse Beach home.

The pictures she had sent back to Kramek were surprising, to say the least. This storm definitely packed more punch than he had suspected.

HIGH WINDS THREW A LARGE PROPANE TANK ONTO KRAMEK'S PROPERTY

We had three propane tanks end up in our front yard, entire staircases were washed up. 

Our home is about 100 feet from the water and we've been there for three years and we have never had water come underneath our house and all the way to the road. -Chris Kramek

CHECK OUT THESE STORM PICS

SAND WAS PLASTERED ON HOMES AS HIGH AS THREE STORIES

MASSIVE WAVES AMONG THE STORM SURGE

TALL PIERS DO THE JOB FOR OCEAN FRONT PROPERTY

Kramek said the home did suffer mostly outside damage; however, water did get in through his attic space.

He was thankful that his home is six feet off the ground supported by thick piers.

Kramek, who resides in W. Stockbridge, is a sales manager at Haddad Subaru in Pittsfield.

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